Quotes

So many people have conveyed things in ways better than myself, so I thought it might be nice to put together some of my favorite quotes and share them here for your viewing and for my own benefit in being able to constantly look back on them. Enjoy!

“The world is full of guys, be a man”

“When poisons become fashionable, they do not cease to kill.”

C.S. Lewis

“A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.”

Theodore Roosevelt

“The education of a man is never complete until he dies.”

Robert E. Lee

“Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.”

Winston Churchill

“How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard.”

Winnie the Pooh

“In private, watch your thoughts; in your family, watch your temper; in society, watch your tongue.”

Cecil B. Hartley

“Real politness is the outward expression of the most generous impulses of the heart. It enforces unselfishness, benevolence, kindness, and the golden rule, ‘Do unto others as you would others should do unto you.’ Thus its first principle is love for the neighbor, loving him as yourself.”

Cecil B. Hartley

“All that we call human history—money, poverty, ambition, war, prostitution, classes, empires, slavery—the long terrible story of man trying to find something other than God which will make him happy.”

C.S. Lewis

“To be a true hero you must be a true Christian. To sum up then, heroism is largely based on two qualities- truthfulness and unselfishness, a readiness to put one’s own pleasures aside for that of others, to be courteous to all, kind to those younger than yourself, helpful to your parents, even if helpfulness demands some slight sacrifice of your own pleasure… you must remember that these two qualities are the signs of Christian heroism.”

G.A. Henty

“Being in love is a good thing, but it is not the best thing. There are many things below it, but there are also things above it. You cannot make it the basis of a whole life. It is a noble feeling, but it is still a feeling. Now no feeling can be relied on to last in its full intensity, or even to last at all. Knowledge can last, principles can last, habits can last but feelings come and go. And in fact, whatever people say, the state called ‘being in love’ usually does not last.

“If the old fairy-tale ending ‘They lived happily ever after’ is taken to mean ‘They felt for the next fifty years exactly as they felt the day before they were married,’ then it says what probably never was nor ever would be true, and would be highly undesirable if it were. Who could bear to live in that excitement for even five years? What would become of your work, your appetite, your sleep, your friendships?

“But, of course, ceasing to be ‘in love’ need not mean ceasing to love. Love in this second sense — love as distinct from ‘being in love’ — is not merely a feeling. It is a deep unity, maintained by the will and deliberately strengthened by habit; reinforced by (in Christian marriages) the grace which both partners ask, and receive, from God.

“They can have this love for each other even at those moments when they do not like each other; as you love yourself even when you do not like yourself. They can retain this love even when each would easily, if they allowed themselves, be ‘in love’ with someone else. ‘Being in love’ first moved them to promise fidelity: this quieter love enables them to keep the promise. it is on this love that the engine of marriage is run: being in love was the explosion that started it.”

C.S. Lewis